Menu
Home
Log in / Register
 
Home arrow Business & Finance arrow Fraud and fraud detection
< Prev   CONTENTS   Next >

OBTAINING DATA FILES

In order to proceed with any data analytical tests, you have to be able to obtain data in a usable format that includes the record fields that you might need for your analysis. In addition to getting the data, the data must be scrubbed or cleansed to correct it from inherent errors to be useful. At times, even perfectly good data must be reorganized in order to perform certain calculations for tests.

Sometimes obtaining useful data requires high-tech knowledge and significant preplanning. For example, SAP,2 enterprise resource-planning software from SAP AG, has more than 70,000 tables—and each table has many fields. The Accounting Document Header table (BKPF) has more than 100 fields.

The information under the subhead Audit Objectives to the end of the subhead Documenting the Results has been extracted and slightly modified (to remove references to appendices not reproduced) from A Practical Guide to Obtaining Data for Auditors,3 published by CaseWare IDEA Inc. IDEA data analytical software is produced by CaseWare IDEA Inc. The author wrote the guide for CaseWare IDEA and the publisher granted permission to include these segments. The reproduced information is generic and can generally be applied in conjunction with other data analytical software.

IDEA licensees can access the full guide at ideasupport.caseware.com/media/ viewpost.aspx?postid=1418.

Audit Objectives

Data exists in various formats, maybe in a single file, possibly within a database, or perhaps even spread over a number of business systems that are not linked to one another. The audit objectives should be the determining factor of the data requirements.

For example, a routine financial audit using IDEA—whether it be to verify mechanical accuracy, valuation, existence, validity, completeness, cut-off, and analysis for other audit steps—may only require data from the accounting system. Files may include the general ledger, detail transactions, accounts payable, inventory, and sales.

For a fraud audit, in conjunction with the accounting system files, data both from access logs and from human resources may be needed. Computer or physical entry log date and times may be compared with accounting postings or authorizations. Personnel records of addresses may be matched to vendor records.

Additional electronic data may be required for forensic and other specific-purpose audits and reviews.

- This section is adapted, with permission, from CaseWare IDEA Inc.

 
Found a mistake? Please highlight the word and press Shift + Enter  
< Prev   CONTENTS   Next >
 
Subjects
Accounting
Business & Finance
Communication
Computer Science
Economics
Education
Engineering
Environment
Geography
Health
History
Language & Literature
Law
Management
Marketing
Philosophy
Political science
Psychology
Religion
Sociology
Travel