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Chapter 3 Data and Privacy Governance Concepts

Computers are magnificent tools for the realization of our dreams, but no machine can replace the human spark of spirit, compassion, love, and understanding.

Louis Gerstner

This chapter will look at the relationship among privacy frameworks and data management, data governance, and data stewardship, highlighting how frameworks such as the OECD Guidelines and GAPP are used for personal information management. Included in this discussion will be a look at Privacy by Design (PbD), which supports and complements privacy engineering (Figure 3-1).

Figure 3-1. Good privacy engineering is built on a foundation of data management and governance

Data Management: The Management of “Stuff”

The raison d'etre of any organization, whether a corporation, a nonprofit, or a governmental entity, is to do “stuff;” doing “stuff” requires managing “stuff.” Data represents this stuff. Examples include:

• Customers

• Suppliers

• Money

• Resources

• Products

• Customer orders

• Customer order line items

• Inventory

• Policies

• Business rules

• Privacy rules

• Roles

• Intellectual property[1]

The administration of the data that represents the “stuff” of an organization is the science and art of data management, or as it is defined in the DAMA Data Management Body of Knowledge: “Data management is the development, execution, and supervision of plans, policies, programs and practices that control, protect, deliver and enhance the value of data and information assets.”

[2]

In a structured data management program, data stewards, who are domain or subject matter experts for each of these classes of data, work with data management experts to ensure that procedures, processes, standards, guidelines, and business rules for using such information support the goals and objectives of the enterprise. This is called data governance.

  • [1] For any enterprise, we would expect to find over 20 different data models containing at least five unique classes or data entities and the relationships between these classes or data entities. We have built these types of enterprise data models for a number of pharmaceutical companies, communications companies, oil companies, hospitality companies, and government agencies, among others.
  • [2] “DAMA-DMBOK Guide (Data Management Body of Knowledge) Introduction & Project Status.”

    dama.org/files/public/DI_DAMA_DMBOK_Guide_Presentation_2007.pdf.

 
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